160 Years of London Underground design and architecture

The All Saints Church, Dahlem and Zoom-Meeting Hüttenweg 46, Berlin

Covers surprising attempts to create some graphic unit, even in the 1860s and 70s, expansion of the Underground and the need to create some cohesion between the different operating companies. Leslie Green's architecture and the Arts & Crafts movement, Frank Pick, Edward Johston's typeface, Charles Holden's architecture and the Streamline Moderne/Art Deco movement, the News Works Programme, post war austerity/design, Victoria Line, loss of Johnson and rescue by Kono, Jubilee Line Extension/architecture, creation of TfL, recent schemes and future works including the Elizabeth Line/Northern Line extension to Battersea, etc.

Charles Dickens: The Man and His Life Through His Characters

The All Saints Church, Dahlem and Zoom-Meeting Hüttenweg 46, Berlin

Charles John Huffam Dickens brought into the world a staggering array of wonderful characters with orphans, starving children, misers, murderers and abusive school teachers among them. People such as Mr Micawber, Fagin and Abel Magwitch remain in one’s literary psyche long after the books are put down. Largely self-educated, Dickens possessed the genius to become the greatest writer of his age with 15 major novels and countless short stories and articles. In his lecture Bertie Pearce looks at the life and places of Dickens through his characters. The talk is interspersed with readings of this works.

A Virtual Tour of Exhibit in the Mauritshuis

The All Saints Church, Dahlem and Zoom-Meeting Hüttenweg 46, Berlin

This exhibit brings us back to Holland of the 17th century with its variety of art including still lifes, portraits, scenes of everyday, landscapes, religious works. But there is a twist - normally when we look at art we use our sense of sight but this exhibit is asking us to use our sense of smell. Smell is a fascinating phenomenon. It works on your memory and your emotions. Andy Warhol said smell really is a time machine transporting us to the past and what about the emotional aspect called the Proustian Memory. So this exhibit is about smells and depictions of smells, can life in 17th century Holland be captured in smell what are their significance and what do they mean to us. Can our sense of smell bring us closer to 17th century Holland and help to enhance our experience of looking at art?

The Age of Jazz

The All Saints Church, Dahlem and Zoom-Meeting Hüttenweg 46, Berlin

Jazz is one of music’s most important genres: a fascinating blend of rigorous structure, free-wheeling creativity, close-knit ensembles and imaginative improvisation. Drawing on his experience both as musicologist and gigging musician, Sandy can shed light on jazz from the inside. His talk covers the early years of jazz up to the Second World War, and touches on the disparate influences which lay behind the emergence of jazz. Musical illustrations range from the blues, ragtime and the very first jazz recordings through to classics by Louis Armstrong’s Hot Five and the Duke Ellington Orchestra, and the dawn of the Swing Era.

The Medieval Guildhall – London’s nerve centre for 2,000 years

The All Saints Church, Dahlem and Zoom-Meeting Hüttenweg 46, Berlin

In the centre of the City of London stands its ancient headquarters, the medieval Guildhall, one of the capital’s hidden gems. The present building dates from 1411 and is still in use today. The whole building stands on the site of London’s Roman amphitheatre the remains of which are still visible today. This lecture describes the Guildhall exterior and interior. We look at some of the key monuments in the building and then study some of the many paintings depicting the Guildhall’s rich history contained in the adjacent Guildhall Art Gallery. We finish by going 18 feet below street level to the Roman amphitheatre.

Guided tour: Secessionen Exhibition (in German)

Alte Nationalgalerie

For the first time an exhibition at the Alte Nationalgalerie is dedicated to a comparison of the three turn-of-the-century art metropolises: Munich, Vienna, and Berlin. As modernism dawned, the artistic avant-gardes pushed for freedom in both the institutions of art and the subject matter it expresses. Many artists of the new art currents of Symbolism, Art Nouveau, and Impressionism were first presented in the highly regarded Secession exhibitions. This exhibition comprises more than 200 paintings, sculptures, and graphic works by 80 artists. Through a collaboration with the Wien Museum, it features not only many artists who can be discovered for the first time, but also foregrounds the œuvre of Gustav Klimt with numerous examples of his work. This is the first time such a comprehensive presentation of Klimt’s work has been shown in Berlin.

Making & Unmaking: The elemental Land Art of Julie Brook

The All Saints Church, Dahlem and Zoom-Meeting Hüttenweg 46, Berlin

Many viewers of a BBC4 profile of artists who work out in nature, presented by Dr James Fox, were haunted by the fire stacks of the only female artist featured, Julie Brook. My lecture explores this fascinating artist and the range of her work over four decades in some of the world’s wild places, centred always on her passion for the islands and coast of West Scotland where she lives. From drawings, oil painting and film to her powerful physical interventions in the landscapes of Britain, North Africa and Japan that engage with the elements of earth, air, fire and water, Julie Brook’s work takes its place alongside such pioneers as Andy Goldsworthy, David Nash and Richard Long.
Simon is lucky enough to have known Julie well for many decades and have access to her archive and never before seen photographs of her work, and my lecture charting her career, will include fragments from her astonishing art films.

David Niven on Screen – from extra to institution

The All Saints Church, Dahlem and Zoom-Meeting Hüttenweg 46, Berlin

Niven’s remarkable career explored, with an examination of his enduring place in public affection. Rising from studio extra to Hollywood leading man, although Niven remained characteristically modest about his abilities they were in fact considerable, as this lecture demonstrates. Particular attention is paid to his military roles, and insights are offered into the huge range of his wartime activities. From his personification of an ideal young subaltern in The Way Ahead, to the reality of being a Lt.-Colonel on Eisenhower’s staff, there was much more to this unique actor than a moustache and a smile.

Tom Thomson and the „Group of Seven“

The All Saints Church, Dahlem and Zoom-Meeting Hüttenweg 46, Berlin

The Group of Seven was formed with the aim of creating a distinctively Canadian art based on the country’s natural landscape. The original members first came together in 1913, and first exhibited as a group in 1920. This lecture will explore examples of their work, which continue to hold great sway in relation to both Canadian art history and national identity. We will also consider their influences, the work of some of their forerunners – including Tom Thomson – and contemporaries, and ask whether they achieved their aims.

Sicilian Splendours: From Greece to the Normans

The All Saints Church, Dahlem and Zoom-Meeting Hüttenweg 46, Berlin

We look at the rich art, architecture and history of Sicily - the largest island of the ancient Mediterranean and, in the ancient world, the wealthiest.
First we see the Carthaginians, the first major invaders of Sicily and their distinctive, enigmatic culture, still visible on the small island of Motya. Afterwards come the Greeks, with beautiful cities such as Agrigento, and Syracuse and Segesta, filled with theatres and temples to the gods.
Then we see Roman Sicily, peaceful and prosperous, with cities such as Syracuse and Taormina, and the sumptuous ‘mosaic villa’ of Piazza Armerina. After Rome, and the new Rome of Constantinople, comes the invasion of the Arabs with their revolution in society and agriculture, and then Norman Sicily - an extraordinary artistic flourishing, culminating in the mosaics of the magnificent Norman basilicas.

The Art of the Cartoonist

The All Saints Church, Dahlem and Zoom-Meeting Hüttenweg 46, Berlin

Harry Venning graduated from the University of Wales, Aberystwyth with a BA in history, formed a touring theatre company bringing new plays to audiences in rural Wales, was then employed for a year as an actor/writer with the Channel Theatre Company in Ramsgate, Kent, before giving up acting and becoming a cartoonist instead.
He has had work published in the UK and abroad, including the strip Clare in the Community which has been a weekly feature in The Guardian since 1996. In 2016 he was awarded Strip Cartoonist of the Year by the UK Cartoon Trust. Harry is also a Sony Award winning writer of radio comedy.
For the last ten years he has been performing his cartoon workshop Release Your Inner Cartoonist in its many different guises, to audiences as diverse as schoolchildren, business executives and festival goers.

The Athletic Aesthetic – Your Arts Society guide to the 2024 Olympics

The All Saints Church, Dahlem and Zoom-Meeting Hüttenweg 46, Berlin

From July to September 2024 Paris will host the Olympic and Paralympic Games. But whilst most onlookers will focus on sport, art and design will also play a part, as they have since the games began at Olympia nearly three thousand years ago. Greek art is replete with representations of athletes on vases, plates and bronzes. Every four years modern day hosts unveil dazzling new architecture, in the form of stadia, arenas, velodromes and swimming pools. The athletes themselves act as torch bearers for ever changing ideals of physical perfection. From nudity to Nike, from sand to synthetics, the Olympic story offers art lovers pure gold.